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Understand MermaidJS; Concepts & Syntax

MermaidJS is great because it brings graphs-as-code to the web! No longer do we need to run graphviz from the commandline to generate static image files each time we make a change; Now we see changes instantly, embed graphs with ease in source repositories and track their changes, etc..

The trouble I’ve had with Mermaid is figuring out the syntax, there are quite a few gotchas which don’t advertise themselves very clearly, such as it not tolerating blank lines, or spaces are comma-deliminated lists.. I’ll list these here so you can get graphing quicker than I did!

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Styling MermaidJS

What’s better than a graph? A graph with style!

Using Mermaid’s class definitions we can style blocks and subgraphs to reflect the ecosystem they belong to; In this case I want to style my infrastructure diagrams to Google’s branding.

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My VSCode

Visual Studio Code, “VSCode”, is the hugely featureful successor to projects like Atom & Visual Studio itself, the extensibility of VSCode is key to this success and I’m going to share what I do to make VSCode work for me.

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my Vim

This is my .vimrc, I find it benefitial to use this where I do development to normalise my editor across different operating systems, and to enable some useful untapped features to make Vim feel a bit less prehistoric.

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Useful Unixisms

Here’s a list of useful piped commands or just commands for which I need a refresher on which arguments to use. For example, using Awk to print between two known lines, or seleting a line in sed are good examples of infrequently used commands which are really useful.

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Git feature branch & merge

Start with your master branch git checkout master git fetch origin If your local master has been modified, you can reset its state. git reset --hard origin/master Checkout a new feature branch. git checkout -b my-feature Make changes in this branch, committing as usual. git add file.txt git commit -m "add my file.txt" You can push your branch to allow others and yourself to evaluate and commit further to it. Read more →

tmux

I find myself working on the move a lot more recently and I often have to deal with poor terminal emulators, iffy connectivity and sometimes I need resume my work on another machine entirely. As such I am trying out tmux as a way of persisting my working environment between sessions, supporting multiple tabs for when my emulator lacks it (Looking at you PuTTY, Git Bash) and lastly allowing me to resume my work on another desktop.

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Joe Heaton
Cloud HPC Engineer

Joe Heaton’s technology-focused murmurings.

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